The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are the only animations of Ducks however, there maybe some used on other pages and more aninations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

 

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A group of Ducks is called a brace, flock when in flight, a raft on water as a team, a badling when paddling on water.

A male duck is called a drake; a female is a hen and babies are ducklings.

Ducks are related to geese and swans. The duck is the smallest of them all and have shorter necks and wings and a stout body.

Ducks can live from 2-12 years, depending on the species. Ducks have webbed feet, which act like paddles and also causes them to waddle instead of walking.

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When constructing her nest, a hen will line it with soft down feathers she plucks from her own breast. This gives the eggs the best possible cushioning and insulation.

Ducks are precocial, which means that ducklings are covered with down and able to walk and leave the nest just a few hours after hatching. A hen will lead her ducklings up to a half mile or more over land after hatching in order to find a suitable water source for swimming and feeding.

Most male ducks are silent and very few ducks actually “quack”. Instead, their calls may include squeaks, grunts, groans, chirps, whistles, brays and growls.

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There are more than 40 breeds of domestic duck. The white Pekin Duck (also called the Long Island duck) is the most common variety raised for eggs and meat. It is harder to tell a male from a female with the Pekin ducks because they look almost the same. Pekin ducks have white or cream coloured feathers and orange coloured bills. They do not fly and do well in captivity.

Ducks provide us with eggs, meat and feathers.

Ducks feet have no nerves or blood vessels. This means ducks never feel the cold, even if they swim in icy cold water.

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Ducks’ feathers are waterproof. There is a special gland that produces oil near the tail that spreads and covers the outer coat of feathers. Beneath this waterproof layer are fluffy and soft feathers to keep the duck warm.

Ducks keep clean by preening themselves with their beaks, which they do often. They also line their nests with feathers plucked from their chest.

Ducks were once wild until they were domesticated by the Chinese many hundreds of years ago.

Because of their familiarity and comic nature, ducks are often featured as fictional characters. The two most famous are Disney’s Donald Duck, who premiered in 1934 and Warner Brothers Daffy Duck, who premiered in 1937.

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Medium.

 

DuckHunterCalling_Med.gif DucksFlying_Med.gif DuckPresenting_Med.gif DuckHoldingUpCarrots_Med.gif DucksFlyingOverCity_Med.gif DuckShakingHeadNo_Med.gif DuckTrying2Fly_Med.gif DuckWaddling_Med.gif DuckWavingWithHat_Med.gif HoboDuck_Med.gif ForagingDuck_Med.gif MumDadBubWakling_Med.gif WinkingDuck_Med.gif DuckUmbrella_Med.gif DuckFloatingInKiddyPool_Med.gif DuckHoldingUmbrellaInRain_Med.gif DuckWalkingProudly_Med.gif DuckRunningWithTube_Med.gif DuckSurfing_Med.gif

 

Only Size.

 

DuckSearching.gif DuckBitingAnother.gif DuckBlink.gif DuckBlink_Left.gif DuckBlink_Right.gif DuckDive.gif DuckFly.gif DuckFlyingBrown.gif DuckFlyingWhite.gif DuckHoldingLoveBalloon.gif DuckHunterCallingReeds.gif DucklingFlying.gif DucklingGoodbye.gif DucklingQuack.gif DuckPondReedsRight02.gif DuckPondReedsLeft02.gif DuckPondReedsRight01.gif DuckPondReedsLeft01.gif DuckrubberPool.gif DuckReadPaper.gif DuckTapPhoneline.gif DuckSing.gif MumDucklings_01.gif MumDucklings_02.gif
DuckBar.gif


 Found in Work/Doctor.


DrQuackShowingXray_Med.gif DrQuackTakingNotes_Med.gif DrQuackWalkingWithMedicCase_Med.gif


 Found in Sayings.


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 Found in SportStuff/Golf.


DuckGolferJumping_Med.gif


 Found in SportStuff/Hunting.


DuckHunting_Med.gif


 Found in SportStuff/Ice-FieldHockey.


DuckFlippingPuck_Med.gif DuckIceHockeyPlayerFalling_Med.gif DuckPlayingIceHockey_Med.gif DucksBattling4Puck_Med.gif

For available Big versions of Duck Animations Click Here.
For available Xtra Large versions of Duck Animations Click Here.



WordMallardsSwimmingOnPond.gif

The green head and yellow bill of the Mallard Duck is a familiar sight to many people living in the Northern hemisphere. In fact, the mallard is thought to be the most abundant and wide-ranging duck on Earth.

Mallards prefer calm, shallow sanctuaries but can be found in almost any body of freshwater across Asia, Europe and North America. They’re also found in saltwater and brackish water and are commonly found in wetlands.

The drake is the more distinctively coloured of the Mallards. Its iconic green head sits atop a white neckband that sets off a chestnut-coloured chest and gray body. Hens are mottled drab brown in colour but sport iridescent purple-blue wing feathers that are visible as a patch on their sides. They grow to about 65cm (26ins) in length and can weigh up to 1.4kg (3lbs).

MallardMaleLooking_Med.gifMallardFemaleLooking_Med.gif

Mallard groups can often be seen head dipping or completely upending in the water. They rarely dive though, spending their time near the surface and dabbling for invertebrates, fish, amphibians and a variety of plants. They also graze on land, feeding on grains and plants.

Mated pairs migrate to and breed in the northern parts of their range and build nests on the ground or in a protected cavity. They normally lay about a dozen eggs and the incubation period lasts just under a month. Mallards are territorial during much of this period but once incubation is well underway, males abandon the nest and join a flock of other males.

Most Mallard species are common and not considered threatened. However one threat to their populations is hybridization (mating) with other duck species.

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Medium.

 

MillyMallardBehindCattails_Med.gif MillyMallardDancing_Med.gif MillyMallardFlylingRight_Med.gif MillyMallardFlylingLeft_Med.gif MillyMallardDucklingsBehind_Med.gif MillyMallardGoingFishing_Med.gif MillyMallardGoodAy_Med.gif MillyMallardNoHuntingSign_Med.gif MillyMallardShakingBooty_Med.gif MillyMallardSwimmingByCattails_Med.gif MillyMallardWaddling_Med.gif MallardFemaleWalking_Med.gif MallardMaleGrooming_Med.gif MallardMaleWalking_Med.gif MillyMallardSwimmingInPond_Med.gif MallardMaleEating.gif

For available Big versions of Mallard Duck Animations Click Here.
For available Xtra Large versions of Mallard Duck Animations Click Here.

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