The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are the only animations of Eagles & Falcons however, there maybe some used on other pages and more aninations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.



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A group of Eagles is called a convocation.

There are approximately 7,000 feathers on an eagle.

The eagle’s nest is called an Eyrie and is built in tall trees or on the top of cliffs. The nests can be as large as 3m(10ft) in diameter and weigh as much as 907kg (1 US ton) in weight. Chicks usually begin to fly at about 3 months of age.

Eagles have been known to steal food from other birds.

Eagles have excellent eyesight hence the term “eagle eye”.

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Females lay 1–3 eggs annually during spring. The incubation period is approximately 35 days.

There are 59 species of eagles although people seem most familiar with the Bald Eagle.

Bald Eagles aren’t really bald. Their heads are covered with short white feathers.

Bald Eagles can have a wingspan of up to 2.4m (8ft) and can weigh as much as 68kg (15lbs).

The Bald Eagle has a lifespan of approximately 25 years in the wild but may live 40 years or more in captivity.

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The Bald Eagle can lift as much as 1.8kg (4lbs).

The Bald Eagle reaches sexual maturity between the ages of 4 to 6 years.

A Bald Eagle remains faithful to its mate until death.

Bald Eagles can fly about 105 k.p.h. (65 m.p.h.) and soar at altitudes of 3km (1.9miles). They can reach a speed of up to 322 k.p.h. (200 m.p.h.) when diving.

The Bald Eagle has a bony protrusion over the eyes to protect from the glare of the sun.

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The head and tail feathers of a Bald Eagle do not turn white until the fourth or fifth year.

The Harpy Eagle is the largest of the eagles weighing 9kg (20lbs) or more.

The habitat of the Harpy Eagle is Central and South American rainforests where it preys on birds and mammals such as monkeys.

The Bateleur Eagle may cover 160km (100 miles) or more a day in search of food.

Golden Eagles are covered with feathers all the way to their toes whereas the Bald Eagle has no feathers on its feet.

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Medium.
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Only Size.

 

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 Found in FolkLaw/Zeus.


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 Found in People/RedIndian.


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Falcon’s (Falco Peregrinus) which means wandering traveller or foreigner.

Falconry is the art of hunting with a falcon. This has been going on in China before 2000B.C.

There are 39 species of falcon. There are 3 subspecies of Peregrines; American, Arctic and Peale’s.

Peregrines are the most well known of the falcons and can live up to 17 years. Some like to migrate south to Latin America in the winter. They can migrate as far as 16,095km (10,000 miles) farther than most other birds.

The female is called a Falcon, the male is called a Tiercel. They vary in size depending on where they live; the biggest are in Alaska. Their wings are thin and pointed and span approximately a metre (40ins).

Slim birds with a small head. The Tiercel is about 1/3 the size of the Falcon. Their bodies average 38-53cm (15-21ins) long and weigh about 907gms (2lbs). The female will weigh about 300gms (10.6ozs) more than the male.

Adult Peregrines have blue-gray wings, backs and heads, with white undersides marked with black bars going across the chest. Their faces are white under their chin. They have large, dark eyes and very sharp beaks and yellow talons (clawed feet). They make a “keek-keek-keek” noise, especially when angry or aggressive.

They have very good eye sight as they can spot a meal up to 1.6km (1 mile) away.”

They are raptors (Latin meaning “to seize”) i.e. birds of prey (carnivores) and will eat other birds includung sparrows, starlings, gulls, ducks and their favourite, pigeons. As a matter of fact during WWII they were often shot in England to keep them from eating the pigeons that were carrying important messages to the forces.

Falcons are the swiftest birds of prey and are very muscular. In level flight the travel about 50 k.p.h. (31 m.p.h.). In a dive (called a “stoop”) they can reach speeds over 300 k.p.h. (186 m.p.h.).

Falcons have a unique way of hunting for food by diving at their prey so fast that they overtake it by surprise, catching it in mid-air and the speed kills the prey instantly. They are diurnal i.e. they hunt during the day.

An adult eats about 64gms (2¼ozs) of food a day (that equals approximately 2 blackbirds).

In the city it has been observed that falcons don’t like to land on the ground; even if their meal falls to the ground, they won’t go get it. In fact, they don’t usually fly lower than the level of their nest.

They are at the top of the food chain, so adult peregrines have no natural predators. They do however, face many threats from humans by the use of pesticides, altering of landscape and habitats, egg collecting, hunting and taking of the young for falconry. Baby falcons (Eyases) are a tasty meal for Owls, Racoons and Mountail Cats.

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Their range is about 50km (30 miles) with their nest in the centre of their range. They do not like other falcons within 5km (3 miles) radius of their nest site.

Their preferred spot for a nest is on the edge of a cliff. Their nesting ledge is called an “aerie”. They don’t use a lot of nesting material. They prepare a saucer shaped indentation in loose soil, sand or grass called “scrape”.

In early spring the Tiercel arrives at the nesting site and begins a lot of fancy aerial displays to attract a mate. Occasionally the male will select several locations for a nest and the female makes the final decision. The female is the boss of the roost and the male is cautious around her.

Falcons are ready to start a family when they are approximately 2 years old.

Falcons lay 3-5 eggs (called a “clutch”), 2-3 days apart. The eggs range from soft pink to reddish brown and are about the size of a duck egg. The incubation period is usually 33 days from the time “active” incubation starts.

Both male and female share the responsibility of incubating (sitting on) the eggs. The eggs need to stay at a constant warm temperature and dry or the embryo (unborn baby) will not survive. If the air temperature is warm, the parents will leave the eggs briefly to hunt.

The eggs also need to be turned; this has been observed and occurs as the birds shift around on the nest. There are times that it looks like the birds are actually rolling the eggs with their mouth or feet. This is so the embryo does not stick to the shell. (If you watch chooks nesting you’ll see the same thing.)

“Pipping” the shell is when the “Eyases” (babies) begin to hatch out. They do this from the inside with an “egg tooth” (a sharp point on the end of their beak). The egg tooth disappears just about immediately. This process can take up to 2 days! They weigh 42.5gms (1½ozs) when first hatched.

Newly hatched, they are wet and covered with a white fuzz called “down”. By 3–5 weeks the fuzz has been replaced by brown feathers.

Males develop faster than females but females are larger and more powerful when fully grown.

In 3 weeks they are 10 times their birth weight; in 6 weeks they are full grown; and at 9–12 weeks they begin to hunt and care for themselves. Their first prey is small game e.g. dragonflies and butterflies.

The first few days of learning to fly is dangerous to the young falcons, especially in urban areas. Wind changes can slam the birds into the ground; with mirrored or illuminated windows being another hazard. Unfortunately statistics are not on their side, only one out of two manages to survive the first year.

In Canada and the U.S. it is illegal to kill or disturb Peregrine Falcons in their nests.

Peregrine Falcons were removed from the federal endangered species list in August of 1999, however the falcon population is being closely monitored by state wildlife departments especially in Ohio and California.

Several agencies bred peregrines in captivity and release the young by “hacking”. Birds that are about a month old are placed in a hack box that has been placed on a cliff or ledge of a building. Food is fed to them through a tube so they do not see the human. Once they can fly and hunt on their own (several weeks later), the box is left open for them to leave.

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