The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are the only animations of Owls however, there maybe some used on other pages and more aninations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

 

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Owls belong to the order Strigiformes, constituting 200 extant (existing) bird of prey species. Most are solitary and nocturnal, with some exceptions; i.e. the Northern Hawk Owl.

They are found in all regions of the Earth except Antarctica, most of Greenland and some remote islands. Though Owls are typically solitary, the literary collective noun for a group of Owls is a parliament.

Living Owls are divided into two families: the typical Owls, Strigidae; the Barn-Owls, Tytonidae.

For most Owl species, females are larger, heavier and more aggressive than males. If the birds are dimorphic, the female is often more richly coloured than the male.

Owls being carnivorous (meat eaters) hunt mostly rodents, small or medium sized mammals, nocturnal insects and other birds, although a few species specialize in hunting fish. After digesting their food, Owls regurgitate hard pellets of compressed bones, fur, teeth, feathers and other materials they couldn’t digest. Ornithologists study those pellets to learn more about an Owl’s diet.

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All Owls have upright posture and forward-facing eyes that give them binocular (human type) vision.

Many Owl species have asymmetrical (not even) ears that are different sizes and different heights on their heads. This gives the birds superior hearing and the ability to pinpoint where prey is located, even if they can’t see it.

Several Owls species have “ear” tufts on their heads but they aren’t ears at all. These tufts of feathers may indicate the bird’s mood, help keep it camouflaged or be used to show aggression.

The flattened facial disk of an Owl funnels sound to the bird’s ears and magnifies it as much as ten times to help the bird hear noises humans can’t detEtc.

An Owl has three eyelids: one for blinking, one for sleeping and one for keeping the eye clean and healthy.

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A Barn–Owl can eat up to 1,000 mice each year and many farmers try to attract Barn–Owls to help control rodent populations in agricultural fields.

The Barn–Owls hearing is so highly developed that they can hunt for their prey in total darkness.

Owls have zygodactyl feet; i.e. two toes that point forward and backward. This gives the birds a stronger, more powerful grip so they can be more effective predators.

Owls have specialized feathers with fringes of varying softness the help muffle sound when they fly. Their broad wings and light bodies also make them nearly silent fliers, which helps them stalk prey more easily.

An Owl’s eyes that are tubular in shape and are supported by bony eye sockets; because of this they cannot turn their eyes. Instead, Owls rotate their heads up to 270° but they cannot turn their heads all the way around.

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Owls not only hoot; they can make a wide range of other sounds, such as screeches, whistles, barks and hisses. During the nesting season, Owl calls can often be heard up to 1½km (1 mile) away.

Most Owls do not migrate but they can be nomadic in searching for the best food sources. Some species, such as the snowy Owl, have regular irruptions.

Baby Owls are called Owlets.

Not all Owl species are nocturnal. How often an Owl is seen during the day depends on the seasonal amount of daylight and darkness, food supplies and habitat.

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The largest recorded Owl fossil, Orinmegalonyx Oteroi, stood about 91cm (3ft) tall.

Owls have long been cultural symbols and they have been found in cave paintings in France, in Egyptian hieroglyphics and even in Mayan art. Today, Owl superstitions associate the birds with bad luck, death and stealing souls in many cultures.

The biggest modern threats to Owls are habitat loss, pesticides that poison the birds and their food supplies and human persecution because of negative superstitions.

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Medium.

 

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