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These are the only animations of Bunnies 01 and more People Animations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

NOTE: Bunnies has been split into 05 pages because of the great N° of animations. The Links to the other pages are found beneath the Page Counter. On page 05 you’ll find the links to the Big & XL animations.

 

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Rabbits have a 360 degree field of vision. This means they can see behind them without having to move their head. They also have very good vision in low lighting so can detect predators quickly and escape. But Rabbits can’t see under their nose. They have a blind spot there so the common practice of letting a rabbit sniff your hand as people often do with dogs can be confusing and threatening to your rabbit. If you have to pet a rabbit make sure you keep your hand in view of their head.

A rabbit’s teeth can grow up to 5cm (4ins) every year. They only get worn down with gnawing and chewing. Os if you have a pet it is absolutely vital they have a good source of appropriate things to chew like hay.

Lop rabbits are born with upright ears. As they age their ears soften and eventually droop to give them their classic lop feature.

Rabbits and hares aren’t the same. They belong to the same animal group called lagomorphs but they are different species. Rabbits are altricial which means their young (called kits or kittens) are born blind, deaf and hairless. They are utterly defenceless. Hares are precocial which mean their young are born with their eyes open, with a full coat of fur and can survive on their own at just a couple of hours old.

Rabbits are designed to eat their own droppings (poop). Wild rabbits mostly eat grass which is hard for their digestive systems to break down. The rabbit will pass the partially digested matter as soft black droppings called cecotropes and eat them within 4–6 hours. After this a normal hard, dry waste matter dropping will be excreted which the rabbit doesn’t use.

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Carrots aren’t a rabbit’s best friend. Bugs Bunny may have munched through several pounds a day but carrots are high in sugar and should only be given to your rabbit in small quantities as a treat.

Rabbit’s can’t vomit. This is because of a very strong valve between the stomach and the oesophagus. This is particularly important to know when it comes to grooming time. Long haired rabbits, such as Angoras in particular can shed a lot of hair in moulting season. If ingested this can cause fur balls which can cause digestive problems for your rabbit. Hay is an important part of your rabbit’s diet because it keeps the digestive system moving.

Most rabbits don’t like being picked up. Even though they may get used to being petted and picked up it isn’t a natural thing for them to do. Rabbits are essentially the bottom of the feeding chain. They are ground dwellers and are used to being able to get away from predators quickly if needed so being held above ground can be very stressful for them.

Rabbit’s ears can reach over 61cm (2ft) long. The longest ears on a bunny were recorded by Guinness World Records in 2003 as belonging to a English Lop named Nipper’s Geronimo. His ears measured an amazing 79cm (31ins). By comparison the longest ears on a dog were just 35cm (13.75ins) which belong to a bloodhound called Tigger!

Rabbits are not rodents. They are lagomorphs. Other lagamorphs include hares and pikas.

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A group of rabbits is called a herd and they live in a warren.

A well cared for house rabbit that has been spayed or neutered early in life has a life expectancy of 8 to 12 years of age.

Rabbits have a very rapid reproductive rate. In Australia and New Zealand breeding season is late July to late January. Normal gestation is about 30 days. The average size of the litter varies but is usually between 4 and 12 babies, with larger breeds having larger litters. A kit (baby rabbit) can be weaned at about 4 to 5 weeks of age. This means in one season a single female rabbit can produce as many as 800 children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A doe is ready to breed at about 6 months of age and a buck at about 7 months. Female rabbits have two lobes to their uterus. Although not advisable, rabbits can carry two litters of different gestational ages at the same time.

The world record for the rabbit high jump is 1 meter (3.3ft) and for the long jump is 3m (9.8ft).

The longest-lived rabbit was nearly 19 years old when he died.

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The largest litter of kits is 24. It has happened twice in 1978 and again in 1999.

The heaviest rabbit is 12kg (26lbs 7ozs).

A rabbit has 18 toenails: 4 on the back feet and 5 on the front.

Rabbits have a tiny "peg" tooth behind each incisor.

The smallest wild rabbit breed is in North American called the Pygmy or Little Idaho Rabbit, which weighs 45gms (slightly less than one pound).

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There are over 150 different rabbit coat colours but only 5 eye colours (brown, blue-grey, blue, marbled and pink).

Rabbits are most active at dawn and dusk.

Rabbits are lagomorphs, not rodents. They are related to Hares and Pikas.

Rabbits are not indigenous to Australia.

Rabbits were released on deserted islands to give shipwrecked sailors a food source until they could be rescued.

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Have you ever heard of Fibonacci?

In the early 13th century he invented a number sequence that goes like this: 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, Etc, Ect, Etc. It is simply a series of numbers where each number is the sum of the previous two numbers, except for the first two of course.

He originally came up with the sequence to explain the breeding rate of rabbits but found that the sequence applied to a great many other things in nature e.g. if you count the clockwise and counter-clockwise spirals of seeds in the head of a sunflower and several other flowers you will find the Fibonacci numbers. This mathematical sequence is found in snails, cowry shells and many other things in nature up to Spiral Galaxies.

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Medium.

 

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