The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are not the only animations of Animals and more Animations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

 

WordCrocodileBiting_Med.gif

Crocodiles evolved from the Archosaurs and lived at the same time as the dinosaurs and probably even ate them! They have survived for all that time as the top predator. They are reptiles that live both on land and in water and like all reptiles, they breathe air.

Scientists can tell the age of a Crocodile by looking at the bones in their scales. Just like a tree, Crocodile bones have growth rings. By counting these rings, they know that male Crocodiles can live to 70-100 years old.

Crocodiles are “cold-blooded”. To get warm they lie in the sun. To cool down, they lie in the shade with their mouths wide open (This is not an aggressive posture as they sweat through the mouth) or laze in the water. To control their body temperature, Crocodiles control the blood flow inside their bodies. They can ‘shut down’ blood flow or speed it up.

A 3.5m (11½ft) Crocodile has brain the same size as a walnut. Despite this they are intelligent and have very good senses for finding prey and learning quickly.

The Crocodiles jaw can open and shut but not move from side to side. Very powerful muscles snap the jaw closed and exert enormous pressure when it grabs prey. The muscles that open the jaw are not as strong and can be held shut by a pair of strong hands or an adhesive band. Each Crocodile jaw carries 24 sharp teeth meant to grasp and crush, not to chew. That’s why they swallow stones that grind the food inside their stomachs (the stomach stones also serve as ballast). The teeth are continuously replaced along the Crocodile’s life. The powerful jaws can be extremely delicate, working like pencils, when removing offspring from the nest. Still, beware at the tail: it inflicts powerful blows.

CrocodileMouthOpen_Med.gif

To swim, the Crocodile swings its powerful tail from side to side. Its legs are held against the body. Both feet have claws but the back feet are webbed. They can be used to swim backwards.

Crocodiles can swim long distances with the help of their powerful tail with speeds up to 40 kph (25 mph) and stay underwater for up to 5 hours. On land, Crocodiles can move quickly up to 80 k.p.h. (50 m.p.h.); although this is only over short distances as they tire quickly. They can also execute jumps out of the water of several meters high.

Saltwater Crocodiles live in both salt water and fresh water.

Female Crocodiles reach sexual maturity at around 2.4m (8ft) and 8 years of age and a male at about 3m (10ft) and ten years.

Female Crocodiles rarely grow larger than 3m (10ft) but males can weigh over a 907.2kg (1 ton U.S.) and measure over 4.9m (16ft) in length.

CrocodileSnappingAtMan_Med.gif

Crocodiles have very good vision; they can see almost 180 degrees but can’t see anything below their nose.

Crocodiles have three eyelids: two leathery protective eyelids and one clear or translucent one.

Saltwater Crocodiles will fight each other in preference to sharing food.

A female Crocodile will come up to the surface of the water and do a very deep, throaty growl to alert the males that she is ready to mate, little scent glands under her throat will exude a sexual fragrance. They will mate for a period of months and seem to enjoy it. They display increased aggressiveness during the mating season.

A female Crocodile instinctively knows whether it will be a wet season or a dry season. They wait until they feel the monsoon coming, as soon as it does, the female will use her back feet to make a perfect hollow and then they go into a trance-like state to lay 20-80 eggs that are incubated in a big compost nest built from plant materials, which can be quite large, a metre or two (3-6½ft) high. The female will defend its nest to the death from any and all animals for three months.

CrocodileBiting_Med.gif

From 500 eggs (about the size of a Goose egg) laid in the wild, only about 2 or 3 will become adult Crocodiles. 99% of the offspring are eaten in the first year of life by water pythons, long-necked turtles, large fish, monitor lizards, hyenas, herons, large storks, adult Crocodiles and humans. During the first weeks of life, the Crocodile offspring eats the food reserves from its viteline sack.

A baby Crocodile gender is determined by how deeply the eggs are buried in the nest and the temperature. Baby crocs ‘chirp’ when they are ready to hatch. When the mother Crocodile hears the babies calling, she runs over to dig them out of the nest. She then carries her babies safely to the water in her mouth.

Crocodiles can live for months without eating because they do not use much energy.

Crocodiles communicate with sounds and body language. To growl, the croc snorts air through the throat or nostrils. The sound is like an idling outboard motor throwing a spray of water into the air from the Crocodiles back. Crocodiles also communicate through their behaviour. Males fight to set up their territories.

The largest Crocodile species is the Saltwater Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), encountered from India to northern Australia and Fiji. In can reach over 7m (23ft) in length and 1 tonne in weight! At 5m (17ft) length, it already is ½ tonne.

CrocodileHeadMoving_Med.gif

The smallest Crocodile is the dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis) from central Africa, which has a maximum length of 1.9m (6½ft). It is more terrestrial than other Crocodiles.

To “cry crocodile tears” is a common expression which is used for depicting fake sadness and has its origins in the myth that reptiles weep while eating humans. However, believe it or not, Crocodiles really do weep while feasting but due to physiological reasons rather than remorse. Their eyes can froth and bubble during the feeding. Air pushed through the sinuses mixes with tears in the animal’s lacrimal (tear) glands and the whole content could be emptied into the eye; resulting in tears.

Crocodile skin is considered one of the finest and best, being soft and durable. In many tribal societies, skin Crocodile is used as a symbol of high status. But only the skin on the belly has these qualities; the back skin is covered in a bone (called osteoderms) that reflects arrows, spears and even bullets!

Some populations venerated the Crocodiles (like the ancient Egyptians). From some tribes in New Guinea, the Crocodile is a totem god and those people make themselves Crocodile-like body scarring, which is an extremely painful procedure.

In the case of Australian Aborigines, some tribes were expert in Crocodile hunt, while for others the Crocodile hunt was taboo.

WomanHuggingCrocodile_Med.gif

The Crocodiles have a four-chambered heart like in birds (their closest relatives) and mammals, for an active life. Still, when diving, the heart behaves like a three-chambered reptilian heart, enabling them to stay more underwater.

If you turn on a light soure at night in waters populated by Crocodiles, you will see pairs of shiny red dots. These are the Crocodiles’ eyes which have a layer called tapetum behind their retina, containing crystals that reflect light and make possible the night vision.

A farmed Crocodile reaches 1.5m (5ft) in length in just one year. In the wild, without such a constant food supply, it requires 3 years to reach the same length.

A Crocodile skin purse can cost $15,000. The value of the Crocodile skin has been fuelling an intense poaching and today many of the 23 species of Crocodiles and relatives are threatened, many populations being wiped out. The salvation of the Crocodiles could come from the Crocodile farms.

Brazilian poachers capture Caymans during the night, by thrusting spears between their eyes (which can be easily spotted night, due to the shiny tapetum layer). The animals are brought into the boats and skinned alive.

CrocsSurroundingAccountant_Med.gif

How can you make the difference between a Crocodile and an alligator? If you are not accustomed to their shape, look at the mouth: Crocodiles have a clearly visible the fourth tooth on the lower jaw even when the mouth is closed (Alligators and Caymans have a groove where that tooth fits). Because Crocodiles have salt glands inside their mouths they can stand sea water, while alligators cannot. That’s why many Crocodiles species abound in mangroves and estuaries. Behaviourally, Crocodiles are more active and more aggressive than alligators and also less resistant to cold (alligators are found in subtropical areas, Crocodiles not).

WordGatorInBushes_Med.gif

The name Alligator is the Spanish term for “lizard”, which early Spanish explorers and settlers in Florida called the Alligator.

An Alligator is a crocodilian in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. There are two existing Alligator species: the American Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) and the Chinese Alligator (Alligator Sinensis).

Alligators in the wild are believed to live 35-50 years. In captivity their lifespan may be significantly longer, perhaps 60-80 years. Currently, there are no scientific methods of analysing an Alligators age while it is alive.

GatorCrawling_Med.gif

The longest recorded length for an Alligator is 5.8m (19.1ft). This animal was trapped in the early 1900’s in the State of Louisiana. Most wild Alligators do not get above 4m (13ft) in length and may weigh 272kg (600lbs) or more.

Alligators and Crocodiles jaws are both hinged on the bottom; the top jaw is simply an extension of the skull.

Alligators are not immune to snake poison. However, they do have extremely tough skin and an armoured back protected by bony plates called scutes. It is possible that this protection may prevent a snake’s fangs from penetrating the skin.

GatorWrestlingRanger_Med.gif

Although the tail of the Alligator is considered the prime cut, all the meat of the Alligator is edible.

Alligators can run at speeds of up to 32 k.p.h. (20 m.p.h.) But that speed can only be maintained for a very short distance.

Male Alligators on average are 4m (13ft) long and weigh about 454kg (1,000lbs). Females usually do not reach 3m (10ft).

Alligators have a variety of successful adaptations to their ecological niche that have allowed these reptiles to remain almost unchanged for eons.

GatorRelaxingKiddyPool_Med.gif

 

Medium.

 



 Crocodile.


CrocRisingFromWater_Med.gif

 Aligtors.


GatorBrushingTeeth_Med.gif GatorDancing_Med.gif GatorFan_Med.gif GatorGolfCourseFeast_Med.gif GatorInTheBushes_Med.gif GatorPopUpWater_Med.gif GatorNavigator_Med.gif

 

Only Size.

 

CrocWalking_Med.gif CrocDancing.gif AligaterWalk.gif

Because there are so many Big & XL animations of I’m going to break them to 2 pages to help in a faster download.
For available Big versions of these Animations: Click Here for Aligtors; Click Here for Crocodile.
For available Xtra Large versions of these Animations Click Here for Aligtors; Click Here for Crocodiles.

 Found in Animals/Birds/Flamingos.


FlamingoStandingOnCrocodile_Med.gif


 Found in InDaysOfYore/Pirates.


PirateRidingCroc_Med.gif CrocodileEatingPirate_Med.gif
BlueBar.gif

 




 Visitor N°
       

Free Text Counter.
Counter added 26/07/2014.

 

ANIMALS.
AFRICA. GIRAFFE. HIPPOS. MONKEY’S Etc. RINO.
ANTS. BADGER. BATS. BEARS. PANDA.
POLAR. BEAVER. BEES & WASPS. BIRDS. BLUEJAY.
CARDINALS. CHICKADEE. CROWS. DOVES & PIGEONS. DUCKS.
EAGLES & FALCONS. FLAMINGOS. GEESE. HUMMING-BIRDS. KIWIS.
OSTRICHES. OWLS. PARROTS. PEACOCKS. PELICANS.
PENGUINS. PUFFINS. ROBINS. SEAGULLS. STORKS.
TOUCANS. TURKEYS. VULTURES. WOOD-PECKERS. BUNNIES.
BUTTERFLIES. CAMELS. CATS. CHIPMUNK. CROCS & ALIGTORS.
DEERS OR RELATED. BUFFALO. LLAMA. MOOSE. REINDEER.
DINOSAURS. DOGS. BASSET HOUND. BLOOD HOUND. BOXER.
BULLDOGS. DACHSHUND. DALMATIAN. GERMAN SHEPHERD. GREYHOUNDS.
GUARD DOGS. POODLE. PUPPIES. PUGS. SAINT BERNARDS.
DONKEY. DRAGONS. ELEPHANTS. FOXES. FROGS.
GOATS. HAMSTERS. HORSES. KANGAROO MOUSE. LIONS Etc.
PANTHERS. TIGERS. MICE. RATS. ON LINE.
PORCUPINES. RACCOONS. REPTILES & BUGS. CATER-PILLARS. FIREFLIES.
GRASS-HOPPERS. LADYBIRDS. LIZARDS. GECKOES. IGUANAS.
SCORPIONS. SNAILS. SNAKES. SPIDERS. SKUNKS.
SQUIRRELS. TURTLES Etc. WEASELS. WOLVES. WORMS.

Top