The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are not the only animations on Elephants, there are some others on other pages.


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The word “Elephant” comes from the Greek word eléfas, meaning “Elephant” or “ivory”. Elephants are the largest terrestrial (earth dwelling) animals on earth. They also have the largest brains. Elephants evolved in the Pleistocene Epoch, i.e. 2 millions to 10,000 years ago. They belong to the family Elephantidae, which comprises of three species: the Forest Elephant, the Savannah Elephant and the Asian Elephant. The Forest Elephant and the Savannah Elephant are commonly known as the African Elephant, whereas the Asian Elephant is better known as the Indian Elephant.

Adult female Elephant is called a cow; the male a bull; and bubs is a calf.

The tusk of an Elephant is nothing but the second upper incisor that grows continuously. It is one of the hereditary characters in Elephants. An Elephant may be either right or left tusked just as people are either left or right handed. Tusks are mainly used as weapons. Tusks of an African Elephant can grow up to 3m (10ft) long and can weigh up to 90kgs (198lbs), whereas tusks of an Asian Elephant vary according to sex, female shows short or no tusk while male have lean tusk, which may be of 3m (10ft) long and around 40kgs (88lbs) weight. Elephants’ tusks continue to grow throughout their lives.

The most characteristic feature of Elephants is their elongated “trunk” or “proboscis”, which is a fusion of nose and upper lip. The trunk is often described as the longest nose and can be up to 2.4m (8ft). It has been found that the trunk has more than 40,000 muscles. The trunk is used for various purposes such as drinking, feeding, defending, interaction with others. It can be use as a snorkel when swimming. By waving their trunks up in the air and from side to side they can smell better. The trunk of an Elephant can hold up to 7.6lts (2 gallons U.S.) of water.

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African Elephants are much bigger in size, possess two finger–like projections in their trunk, have flat forehead and have large ears and tusks, whereas in comparison, Asian Elephants are smaller in size, possess only one finger–like projection in their trunk, have two bumps on their forehead and have smaller ears and tusks.

Skin of Elephant is about 2.5cm (1in) thick and covered with light hairs, colour of hair vary from grey to brown. Usually brown colour is due to wallowing in dust or mud. Elephants usually wallow in mud to generate heat and also to protect from harmful rays and insects. The African Elephants use their ears to aid in ventilation in maintaining temperature.

Elephants are herbivores (vegetation eaters) and eat about 5% of their body weight. They spend nearly 16–18 hours a day in eating anywhere from 45–453.5kgs (100–1000lbs) of vegetation in an hour period, however only 40% of the ingested food gets digested. They drink approximately 114–304lts (30–80 gallons U.S.) of water in a day.

An interesting phenomenon about Elephants is their cycle of tooth rotation. An Elephant can have 28 teeth in its entire life, which are 2 milk precursors of the tusk, 2 second upper incisor teeth, i.e. tusks, 12 premolar teeth and 12 molar teeth. A tooth can weigh as much as 3kgs (6.6lbs).

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Females mature at about 11 years of age and stay in herds with the other older females, whereas males mature between 12 to 15 years of age and stay solitarily. The sexual features are not so distinct for both males and females, and are often confused during identification. Male possesses internal testes, which can’t be seen and female possesses two teats between her front legs. Usually females are identified by their pronounced forehead, which is not present in case of males.

A male Elephant mates with a female Elephant at around 20 years of age. Before mating, a male Elephant secretes strong–smelling urine, which attracts compatible females. Sometimes, they communicate with a rumbling sound for mating.

The gestation period of Elephant is approximately 22 months; that is the longest of all the existing land animals. One calf is born at a time (twins are extremely rare). The young calf is nearly blind. It uses its trunk to explore its surroundings and relies on elders of the group. At birth, an Elephant calf weighs about 100–120kgs (220–264lbs) and is about 76cm (2.5ft) tall. The calf often sucks its trunk for comfort and lives with its dam (mother) for many years.

An Elephant may live as long as 60–70 years. Although, the oldest recorded Elephant was 82 years.

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Elephants are associated with many cultures. Asian cultures represented Elephant as a symbol of “wisdom”, especially for their memory and intelligence. They are regarded as a very social, emotional and intelligent group. The entire herd takes care of the calves and protects them from danger. Often they grieve when any member of their group dies.

Apart from body movements and trumpeting Elephants purr like cats do, as a means of communication.

Elephants flap their ears to help in keeping cool.

Elephants use their feet to listen, they can pick up sub–sonic rumblings made by other Elephants, through vibrations in the ground.

Elephants have a slow pulse of 27.

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The Elephant is the only mammal that can’t jump.

The Elephant is the national animal of Thailand.

In 1916, an Elephant was tried and hung for murder in Erwin, Tennessee.

Elephants have been known to learn up to 60 commands.

During World War II, the very first bomb dropped on Berlin by the Allies killed the only Elephant in the Berlin Zoo.

By the way according to Mythbusters Elephants are scared of mice.

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Medium.

 

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Only Size.

 

BabyElephantWalkingLeft.gif BabyElephantWalkingRight.gif ShyElephant_Med.gif BabyElephant.gif ElephantBlowBubble.gif ElephantVacuumCleaner.gif ElephantWalking.gif ElephantEatingHay.gif

 Found in Circus.


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 Found in FairyTalesStories.


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 Found in Food/FruitVeges.


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 Found in People/Natives.


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For available Big versions of these Animations Click Here.
For available Xtra Large versions of these Animations Page 01 Click Here.
For available Xtra Large versions of these Animations Page 02 Click Here.

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