The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are not the only animations of Animials and more Animations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

 

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Frogs versus Toads.

Frogs live around any water source, such as swamps, marshes, lakes, rivers, streams and temporary pools of water caused by flooding or rainfall but toads do not.

Frogs have eyes that are set higher, are rounder and bulge out of their head. Toads have eyes that are set lower on their head and are shaped like a football.

Frogs have smooth skin that is moist and looks slick. Toads have dry skin with bumps on it.

Frogs jump high and long. Toads will not jump but only hop or actually run if they have to.

Frogs have many predators but the skin of a toad has a bitter taste and scent that burns the nose and eyes of anything that bites it.

Some toads can live up to 40 years but of the Frogs, poisonous ones live from 7-17 years.

Before touching a Frog, always wash your hands and do not dry them. Sunscreen and insect repellent on human hands will kill a Frog or Toad.

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Frogs.

Australian Tree Frogs emit a chemical substance that heals wounds on humans.

Frogs can enter a state of relaxation by turning it over on its back and gently rubbing its belly in a circular motion.

Warts cannot be transmitted from Toads or Frogs. This is a myth stated around the 14th century.

Frogs absorb water through their skin so they don’t need to drink.

The eyes and nose of a Frog are on top of its head so it can breathe and see when most of its body is under the water.

Found in Argentina, the Ornate Horned Frog can eat an entire mouse with one swallow.

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Frogs can lay as many as 4,000 eggs in Frogspawn.

Frogs have long back legs and webbed feet for jumping and swimming.

Certain Frogs can jump up to 20 times their own body length in a single leap.

Frogs are carnivores, meaning they eat meat. The largest of Frogs eat snakes, turtles, mice, chicks, bats and even smaller Frogs. They usually eat meat (bugs and worms) and swallow their food whole.

The Goliath Frog is the world’s largest, found in Cameroon, in West Africa. Their bodies can get to 30cm (12ins) in length and their legs are at least that long.

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The Gold Frog, measuring 1.27cm (½in), has always been the smallest Frog in the world but in April 2009, a new species was found in the Andes Mountains in Peru. The female measures up to 1.24cm (0.49in) and the male only 1.12cm (0.44in). The smallest Frog in the Americas is the ‘Brazilian Baby Frog’, which is smaller than ten cent piece.

In the Seychelles, there is a male Frog that carries its young around on its back until they become adults.

People who study Frogs and toads are called herpetologists. Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles.

Frog bones form a new ring every year when the Frog is hibernating, just like trees do. Scientists can count these rings to discover the age of the Frog.

Because Frogs come out in the rain, people used to think that they fell to earth in the rain! And in nineteenth century England, people tried catching them to prove it.

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One type of desert Frog can wait as long as seven years for water by surrounding itself in a type of transparent bag that becomes its first meal once the rain comes.

Amphibians’ eyes come in all shapes and sizes. Some even have square or heart shaped pupils. But amphibians don’t see colour -- they only see in black or white.

In recent years, a painkiller with 200 times the power of morphine has been found in the skin of a Frog.

The male Darwin’s Frog takes its mate’s eggs into its mouth as soon as they show signs of life and they stay there until they emerge as fully grown Froglets.

Most Frogs do not live in the water, only near it. They cannot live in the sea or any salt water.

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Frogs can be found everywhere on earth except Antarctica. There are more than 4,000 types of amphibians in the world but Europe has only 45 species.

Many of the most brightly coloured tropical Frogs are coloured in this way to warn predators that they are poisonous. The Golden Dart Frog is the most poisonous Frog on earth; with the touch of its skin it can kill a human; the skin of one Golden Dart could kill up to 1,000 people. Some Frogs are imitators of poisonous ones, like the Poison Dart Frog.

Female Frogs are hard to find as they are silent most of the time.

Reduction of the Frog population, especially in Asia and developing countries, causes increase in diseases carried by mosquitoes, since Frogs eat thousands of mosquitoes every day.

Frogs do not keep on growing throughout their life cycles. They stop growing at the average height for their species.

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The purple Frog, recently rediscovered in India, has almost no head, a pointed pig snout nose and sounds like a chicken when it speaks.

The Amazon Horned Frog is about the size of a coffee cup and uses its woodsy colouring to bury into the underbrush with only its head above ground. If anything comes by, the size of its own body or smaller, it leaps out and swallows it hole, using its sharp teeth.

Frog eyes bulge outward to enable them to see in all directions, though their eyes appear to stare blankly. They also have a third eyelid which helps protect their eyes underwater and keeps them moist on land. They can retract their eyes and when they do, they bulge inward in their mouths and help them swallow their food. Some Frogs have a patch on top of their heads which is like a third eye. It reacts to light to aid the Frog in navigation. A Frog can only see moving things. It could literally starve to death with live prey in front of it if the prey never moved.

The North American Wood Frog is the only species of Frog found above the Arctic Circle and in winter it actually freezes, its heartbeat stops and it thaws again in spring, coming back to life.

Frogs can be found living in deserts, mountaintops, rain forests, tundras and caves.

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Frogs can adjust their life cycle timing to adapt with their habitat e.g. if they live in a desert area with little rainfall, they can actually lay their eggs in a wash as soon as rainfall begins and the eggs will go from tadpole to Frog in as little as ten days.

African Dwarf Frogs live mostly underwater, coming up for air every now and then.

Frogs can jump over 20 times their body length. The longest jump ever recorded was 85.334cm (33.6ins), at a South African Frog derby.

Tree Frogs have pads on their toes with tiny bumps that cause friction, even on wet surfaces.

The Flying Tree Frog of Costa Rica uses the webbing between its toes to act like parachutes as it leaps from tree to tree.

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The study of how Frogs adhere to slippery surfaces is being used to develop anti-skid devices in human technology.

Frogs breathe with three parts of their bodies: skin, mouth and a membrane covering the inside of their mouths. Their skin takes in oxygen from their environment. They inhale and exhale through their mouths.

A Frog’s sticky tongue is used like fly fishing. When it sees a meal, it casts out its tongue and reels it back in to swallow the meal.

Some Frogs like the Squirrel Tree Frog have large sacs that expand to resonate sound. Some Frogs can make sounds without any special sac.

Frogs call out for different reasons: mating calls, territorial calls, weather announcement calls and cries for help.

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Male Frogs are the only ones who sing, to attract mates and warn off other males. Females listen to the mating song and choose a mate on which one is the loveliest.

Small Frogs eat insects like flies, mosquitoes and dragon flies but they will also eat snails, worms, small fish and spiders.

Frogs don’t drink water the way we do but absorb it through their skin. Some Frogs have places on their bellies which also absorb water.

Frogs who have no tongues use their fingers to catch prey and put it into their mouths.

Some Frog species have teeth to help them hold their live prey but they do not chew.

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Most Frogs are either brown and earthy tones or green to blend in with foliage.

The fire-bellied toad uses flash colour, where he only displays his bright colours under threat of attack, which confuses predators and provides time for escape.

Some species, like the Chilean Four-Eyed Frog, has a pair of bumps on its rear that are hidden until it’s in danger and by lowering its head, the larger rear portion appears to be the head of a larger Frog than it is.

Most metal sheds can be a death trap to Frogs if they contain herbicides, pesticides and other chemicals poisonous to Frogs.

Some Frogs use camouflage by remaining one colour in a season and changing with the surrounding foliage the next season.

A Frog in captivity, if cared for properly, will generally live much longer than those in the wild.

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Tadpoles.

A tadpole is also known as a Polliwog.

Frogs lay anywhere from hundreds to thousands of eggs, in water and the males fertilizes them.

Tadpoles vary in characteristics from species to species. Scientists are beginning to be able to tell the Frog species apart by their tadpoles.

One species of tadpole, the Axolotl, is actually a salamander that never grows to be an adult lizard but retains its gills and fins and procreates at this stage.

Though most Frogs abandon their eggs, some Frogs carry the eggs on their backs, in their mouths and the Marsupial Frog has a pouch for them.

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Medium.

 

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Only Size.

 

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Approximately 230 of the known world’s 5,280 species of frog occur in Australia. Compared with most other countries this number is fairly low. This could be related to the aridity of most of the continent. Regardless of the lack of species there is a great variety of habitats among Australian frogs. Differences in rainfall, altitude, climate and location have resulted in a large number of habitats that Australian Frog species inhabit.

Throughout the 1980’s declines were reported in Australian frog species. Frogs that were reported as declining were high altitude creek dwelling species that had little or no contact with human behaviour. This indicates that habitat loss and conditions were not responsible for all the declines. The causes for the affected declines are unknown but some say that the chytrid fungus may be a factor.

There is Currently three Australian species of frogs classified as extinct, 14 are listed as critically endangered and 18 listed as endangered. Of the 14 critically endangered species 4 of them haven’t been sited for 15 years or more and may now be extinct.

The Australian Frogs are broken up into 5 Families, 6 Sub-Families and 26 Genera.

  1. Bufonidae - There is only one species off this family in Australia that being the Cane Toad (Bufo Marinus) an introduced species (I’d prefer pest) brought from Hawaii in 1935 and released in several locations throughout Queensland and now has worked its way into Northern N.S.W. and the N.T.


  2. Hylidae - This family consists of 3 genera in Australia that being Cyclorana, Litoria and Nyctimystes.
    • Cyclorana is a genus of frog that occurs entirely in Australia.
    • Litoria occurs throughout Australia, New Guinea, the Lesser Sunda Islands, the Bismarck Archipelago, Solomon Islands Moluccan Islands and Timor.
    • Nyctimystes is primarily a New Guinea genus but also occur on the Moluccan Islands and Australia.

  3. Microhylidae - This family consists of two genera in Australia being Austrochaperina and Cophixalus. Most of the species in these two genera inhabit New Guinea with numerous species occurring in Australia.


  4. Myobatrachidae - This family is only found in Australia and New Guinea, with the greater majority of the species occurring in Australia.


  5. Ranidae - This family is found on all of the continents except Antarctica. In Australia a solitary species, the Australian Wood Frog.

A fairly comprehensive list of Assie Frogs.

Bibron’s Toadlet
(Pseudophryne Bibroni)
Bleating Tree Frog
(Litoria Dentata)
Blue Mountains Tree Frog
(Litoria Citropa)
Broad-palmed Frog
(Litoria Latopalmata)
Cane Toad (not indigenous)
(Bufo Marinus)
Corroboree Frog
(Pseudophryne Corroboree)
Dainty Tree Frog
(Litoria Gracilenta)
Dusky Toadlet
(Uperoleia Fusca)
Eastern Banjo Frog
(Limnodynastes Dumerili)
Eastern Common Froglet
(Crinia Signifera)
Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog
(Litoria Fallax)
Fleay’s Barred Frog
(Mixophyes Fleayi)
Freycinet’s Frog
(Litoria Freycineti)
Giant Barred Frog
(Mixophyes iteratus)
Giant Burrowing Frog
(Heleioporus Australiacus)
Giant Tree Frog
(Litoria Infrafrenata)
Great Barred Frog
(Mixophyes Fasciolatus)
Green and Golden Bell Frog
(Litoria Aurea)
Green Stream Frog
(Litoria Phyllochroa)
Green Tree Frog
(Litoria Caerulea)
Growling Grass Frog
(Litoria Raniformis)
Jervis Bay Tree Frog
(Litoria Jervisiensis)
Laughing Treefrog
(Litoria Tyleri)
Leaf Green Tree Frog
(Litoria Nudidigita)
Lesueur’s Tree Frog
(Litoria Lesueuri)
Littlejohn’s Tree Frog
(Litoria Littlejohni)
Magnificent Tree Frog
(Litoria Splendida)
Mountain Stream Tree Frog
(Litoria Barringtonensis)
Northern Banjo Frog
(Limnodynastes Terraereginae)
Ornate Burrowing Frog
(Limnodynastes Ornatus)
Pearson’s Tree Frog
(Litoria Pearsoniana)
Peron’s Tree Frog
(Litoria Peroni)
Pouched Frog
(Assa Darlingtoni)
Red-backed Toadlet
(Pseudophryne Coriacea)
Red-crowned Toadlet
(Pseudophryne Australis)
Red-eyed Tree Frog
(Litoria Chloris)
Red-groined Froglet
(Paracrinia Haswelli)
Rocket Frog
(Litoria Nasuta)
Salmon-striped Frog
(Limnodynastes Salmini)
Smooth Toadlet
(Uperoleia laevigata)
Southern Barred Frog
(Mixophyes Balbus)
Southern Brown Tree Frog
(Litoria Ewingi)
Spotted Marsh Frog
(Limnodynastes Tasmaniensis)
Stoney Creek Frog
(Litoria Wilcoxi)
Striped Burrowing Frog
(Litoria Alboguttata)
Striped Marsh Frog
(Limnodynastes Peroni)
Tasmanian Froglet
(Crinia Tasmaniensis)
Tasmanian Tree Frog
(Litoria Burrowsae)
Tusked Frog
(Adelotus Brevis)
Tyler’s Toadlet
(Uperoleia Tyleri)
Verreaux’s Tree Frog
(Litoria Verreauxi)
Wallum Froglet
(Crinia Tinnula)
Whirring Tree Frog
(Litoria Revelata)


 The Tree Toad.

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A tree toad loved a she-toad,
Who lived up in a tree.
He was a three-toed tree toad,
But a two-toed toad was she.
The three-toed tree toad tried to win,
The two-toed she-toad’s heart,
For the three-toed tree toad loved the ground,
That the two-toed tree toad trod.
But the three-toed tree toad tried in vain.
He couldn’t please her whim.
From her tree toad bower,
With her two-toed power,
The she-toad vetoed him.



Because there are so many Big & XL animations of I’m going to break them to 2 pages to help in a faster download.
For available Big versions of these Animations: Click Here for Page 01; Click Here for Page 02.
For available Xtra Large versions of these Animations Click Here for Page 01; Click Here for Page 02.

 Found in Animals/Birds/Pelicans.


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 Found in Christian/BiblePeople/
Moses.


PharaohPlagueFrogs_Med


 Found in FairyTalesStories.


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 Found in FolkLaw/Gnomes.


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 Found in FolkLaw/Fairies.


FairyOnFrog_Med.gif


 Found in Music/Animals.


FrogPlayingBanjo_Med.gif FrogPlayingBanjoDance_Med.gif FrogPlayingBanjo01.gif


 Found in People/Girls/Jane.


JaneAtDeskFrogPronceOnScone_Med.gif JaneAtDeskSurprisedByFrog_Med.gif JaneAtDeskTopFrogPronce_Med.gif


 Found in People/Home/Bathroom/Tubs.


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 Found in Sayings.


LookBeforeYouLeapFrog_Med.gif


 Found in Science/Experiments.


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 Found in Transport/Road/Cars.


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ANIMALS.
AFRICA. GIRAFFE. HIPPOS. MONKEY’S Etc. RINO.
ANTS. BADGER. BATS. BEARS. PANDA.
POLAR. BEAVER. BEES & WASPS. BIRDS. BLUEJAY.
CARDINALS. CHICKADEE. CROWS. DOVES & PIGEONS. DUCKS.
EAGLES & FALCONS. FLAMINGOS. GEESE. HUMMING-BIRDS. KIWIS.
OSTRICHES. OWLS. PARROTS. PEACOCKS. PELICANS.
PENGUINS. PUFFINS. ROBINS. SEAGULLS. STORKS.
TOUCANS. TURKEYS. VULTURES. WOOD-PECKERS. BUNNIES.
BUTTERFLIES. CAMELS. CATS. CHIPMUNK. CROCS & ALIGTORS.
DEERS OR RELATED. BUFFALO. LLAMA. MOOSE. REINDEER.
DINOSAURS. DOGS. BASSET HOUND. BLOOD HOUND. BOXER.
BULLDOGS. DACHSHUND. DALMATIAN. GERMAN SHEPHERD. GREYHOUNDS.
GUARD DOGS. POODLE. PUPPIES. PUGS. SAINT BERNARDS.
DONKEY. DRAGONS. ELEPHANTS. FOXES. FROGS.
GOATS. HAMSTERS. HORSES. KANGAROO MOUSE. LIONS Etc.
PANTHERS. TIGERS. MICE. RATS. ON LINE.
PORCUPINES. RACCOONS. REPTILES & BUGS. CATER-PILLARS. FIREFLIES.
GRASS-HOPPERS. LADYBIRDS. LIZARDS. GECKOES. IGUANAS.
SCORPIONS. SNAILS. SNAKES. SPIDERS. SKUNKS.
SQUIRRELS. TURTLES Etc. WEASELS. WOLVES. WORMS.

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