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These are the only animations of Iguanas and more Animals Animations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

 

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The average life span in the wild is 20 years; it is usually much shorter in captivity since many owners do not have the appropriate knowledge to take care of iguanas.

Iguana mothers lay the eggs underground and leave them. Babies hatch, dig themselves out and then they are on their own to survive.

When they are young they eat leaves, fruits, flowers snails and insects but as they grow they shift to a 95% vegetation diet.

They live in places where the water is abundant, like tropical rain forests.

They are able to hold their breath for up to 30 minutes.

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Iguanas can be trained many people think that iguanas are stupid animals. However, people who own iguanas can actually attest to the opposite. Some people have toilet-trained their Iguanas. Other people have trained their iguanas to do different types of tricks. Some iguanas can even find their way home!

The bag they have under their jaw works as a camel’s hump. It stores fat in order to survive in case they can’t find food.

Herbivorous lizards such as the Green Iguana can conserve water by excreting excess salt from the blood stream through a nasal ‘salt gland’. This is what produces the crusty white substance often sneezed out by iguanas.

The ‘third’ or parietal eye seen on the top of the head of some lizards (such as the Green Iguana) contains a lens and retina-like structure, which connects via nerves to the pineal gland in the brain. Although it does not form images, this structure is important in governing hormone production related to time spent basking.

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The tail makes up at least half the body length of an Iguana and if the tail is cut off, they can grow another one. Because of their tail’s weak vertebrae, often iguanas break their tail to escape after getting caught.

Green Iguana usually live in tropical rainforest approximately 12-15m (40-50ft) above the ground. They have sharp claws for digging and are roughly 2m (6½ft) long, weighing 4½-7kgs (10-15½lbs).

Green Iguanas are venomous however their venom is not produced in sufficient quantities to be harmful to humans.

Marine Iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) AKA: Galapagos Marine Iguana and the Sea Iguana are between 50-100cms (20-39ins) long and they weigh up to 10kgs (22lbs), although there is a vast size difference between the iguanas from different islands. The largest Marine Iguanas are found on Fernandina and Isabella Islands where as the smallest Marine Iguanas are found on Genovesa Island.

Marine Iguanas are the only lizards that forage for food in the sea. They are black or grey in colour but during the breeding season adult males develop red and green colouration and young Marine Iguanas have a lighter coloured dorsal stripe.

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Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus Dorsalis), Each Desert Iguana’s spices is definitely distinguished having varied colours.

They have triangular shaped dorsal scales and a long tail that they use to propel them through the water while swimming. They are often encrusted in a white substance which is mainly excess salt that has been excreted from their nasal glands.

Marine Iguanas can lose up to 10°c of body heat during a dive into the sea, so after each dive they return to shore to bask in the sun and warm up. During this period they are unable to move effectively and can be highly aggressive towards any potential predators as they are unable to run away until their body temperature has risen.

Marine Iguanas mainly feed on marine algae. Larger Iguanas dive into the sea to forage and can dive down to depths of 12m (39ft) and stay submerged for over an hour, however, under normal conditions they make shallow dives that usually last around 10 minutes. Smaller Iguanas do not enter the water; instead they feed on algae from the rocks in the tidal zone.

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The breeding season begins in December and males develop red and green colouration and fight aggressively for the opportunity to mate. Females move inland and lay 1-6 eggs in a sandy burrow. Thousands of females can be found nesting in the same area as suitable nesting sites are scarce.

Females will stay and defend their burrow for several days then they leave the eggs to incubate. After 2-3 months the young iguanas dig their way out of the nest and move to the intertidal zone to feed.

Predators of Marine Iguanas and their young include hawks, owls, rats, seabirds, cats and dogs.

There are seven subspecies of Marine Iguana that are found throughout the Galapagos Islands. They differ in size and colour depending on which island they are found on. (Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Albemarlensis; Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Cristatus; Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Hassi; Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Mertensi; Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Nanus; Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Sielmanni; Amblyrhynchus Cristatus Venustissimus.) When they are not foraging in the sea, they spend their time basking on rocks and often several thousand individuals can be seen together on the same stretch of shore.

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Source: several sites on the net.



Medium.

 

IguanaCatchingFlies_Med.gif IguanaChasingFly_Med.gif IguanaCrawling_Med.gif IguanaFlickingOutTongue_Med.gif IguanaOnRockResting_Med.gif IguanaRidingUnicycle_Med.gif IguanaWalking2Work_Med.gif IguanaWalkingUprightRight_Med.gif IguanaWalkingUprightLeft_Med.gif

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