The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are not the only animations of Animals and more Animations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

NOTE: You’ll find the links to the Big & XL animations in the table near the bottom of the page.

 

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There are 13 species of Skunks, which are divided into four genera: Mephitis (Hooded and Striped Skunks, 2 species), Spilogale (Spotted Skunks, 4 species), Mydaus (Stink Badgers, 2 species) and Conepatus (Hog-Nosed Skunks, 5 species). The two Skunk species in the Mydaus genus inhabit Indonesia and the Philippines; all other Skunks inhabit the Americas from Canada to central South America.

There are four different kinds of Skunks found in the Americas. The spotted and Striped Skunks are the most widely distributed and therefore more likely to come into contact with people. The Hooded and Hog-Nosed Skunks are rarer and found mostly in Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. The Spotted Skunk prefers the country and spends most of its life near farms. The Striped Skunk is more adaptable and lives in a variety of habitats including the woods and fields (like most Skunks), urban areas, attics of houses, throughout North America, except the deserts of the Southwest.

All Skunks are able to dig their own burrows but will quite often use abandoned dens, hollow logs, wood or rock piles, under buildings, stone walls, hay or brush piles and trees or stumps.

Skunks were formerly considered to be of the subfamily, Mephitinae, of the Mustelidae family of weasels and related animals. They are now placed in their own family of Mephitidae (catchers of mice). This placement is supported by genetic evidence indicating that they are not as closely related to the Mustelidae as formerly thought (Dragoo and Honeycutt 1997).

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Skunk is the common name for any of the largely omnivorous mammals comprising the carnivore family Mephitidae; characterized by conspicuous patterns of black and white stripes and spots and well-developed anal scent glands used to produce noxious odours to deter threats. In a more specific sense, Skunk can be used to refer to those members comprising the New World genera Mephitis, Conepatus and Spilogale, with eleven extant species, while stink badger is the common name for members of the Old World genus Mydaus of Southeast Asia, with two extant species. Stink badgers only recently have been placed as part of the Skunk family. Skunks sometimes are referred to as polecats.

Skunks are not aggressive toward humans but their first line of defence is a complex chemical substance that includes sulphuric acid that can be fired from either one of two independently targetable anal glands; it’s an extremely smelly yellow oily foam. Because of this ability, Skunks will stand and face a threat rather than run away but before a Skunk sprays it goes through a series of warning motions. First it erects its tail and stamps its feet; then hisses. If the intruder hasn’t departed by then, the Skunk will spray and the spray can reach accurately as far away as 3.7m (12ft) and the Skunk can do it as many as 8 times in a row. Afterward, the Skunk needs sometimes over a week to reload the glands. So Skunks spray sparingly.

The spray works well with people and animals but is useless against cars. As a result, many Skunks die on roadways -- to the point of being wiped out entirely from areas with a lot of traffic.

When a Skunk sprays he aims for the face and eyes. The spray does not hurt or damage humans or other animals it’s only a terrible smell that lasts for days and is very difficult to get rid of.

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Skunks are omnivorous, eating both plant and animal material and changing their diet as the seasons change. They eat insects and larvae, earthworms, small rodents, lizards, salamanders, frogs, snakes, birds, moles and eggs. They also commonly eat berries, roots, leaves, grasses, fungi and nuts. Sometimes Skunks may be found acting as scavengers, eating bird and rodent carcasses left by cats or other animals. In settled areas, they also seek human garbage; pet owners, may experience a Skunk finding its way into a garage or basement where pet food is kept.

Skunks are one of the primary predators of the Honeybee, relying on their thick fur to protect them from stings. They scratch at the front of the beehive; then eat the guard bees that come out to investigate. Mothers are known to teach this to their young. A family of Skunk can depopulate a healthy hive in just a few days. They tend to be gluttonous feeders and gain weight extremely quickly if their diet becomes too fatty.

Skunks are resistant to snake venom and can survive 10 times the venom needed to kill an animal of the same size.

The Striped Skunk is true to its name, both common and scientific (mephitis mephitis) actually means ‘noxious gas, noxious gas’. Striped Skunk are characterized by a black body with a narrow white stripe on the forehead and wider stripes that extend from the neck along each side of the back. It is about the size of a large domestic cat while the Spotted Skunk is around half that size. Other Skunks are: the Hog Nose Skunk and the Hooded Skunk.

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Although they have excellent senses of smell and hearing; they have poor vision and cannot see objects beyond approximately 3m (9.8ft) away with any clarity, which makes them vulnerable to road traffic. Roughly half of all Skunk deaths are caused by humans, as road-kill or as a result of shooting and poisoning.

Skunks co-exist with foxes, raccoons and coyotes and sometimes they even share the same burrow with a Skunk.

Skunks are placid, retiring and non-aggressive. They try very hard not to get in harm’s way. They have a home range of a few hundred acres at most. They are primarily nocturnal (night dwellers) and usually solitary – except when breeding or mothers are raising their babies. They are active throughout the year but in northern areas, they spend the coldest parts of the winter in their dens.

Both sexes occupy overlapping home ranges through the greater part of the year; typically 200–400 hectares (494.2–988.4 acres) for females, up to 2,000 hectares (4,942 acres) for males. Male’s territories usually partially overlap that of 2 or more females.

Breeding usually occurs in late winter or early spring and gestation averages about 60–75 days, so babies are usually born in May or June. Second litters and late births do occur. After mating, a female can store the male’s sperm and delay initiating pregnancy for some weeks. Litters range from 3–10 young (called Kits). When raising offspring, males do not help the females.

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When born, Kits are blind, deaf and covered in a soft layer of fur. After one week, they can begin to use their stink glands in defence but until that time rely on the mother. About three weeks after birth, their eyes open. The kits are weaned about two months after birth and begin foraging on their own but generally stay with their mother until they are ready to mate, at about one year of age.

Each Skunk has its own unique coloration pattern.

Their greatest Enemies are the Great Horned Owls and Bobcats.

Skunks can carry rabies but it is important to remember that not every Skunk is rabid. Only if an adult Skunk seen in the daytime is showing abnormal behaviours such as paralysis, unprovoked aggression, moving in circles, self-mutilation, should you call the police.

Skunks being kept as pets by certain Native Americans were reported by early European settlers in America. The Pilgrims are also said to have kept Skunks as pets.

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SkunkHoldingRose_Med.gif SkunkHoppingLeft_Med.gif SkunkHoppingRight_Med.gif SkunkPegOnNose_Med.gif SkunkRunningLeft_Med.gif SkunkRunningRight_Med.gif SkunkRunningUprightLeft_Med.gif SkunkRunningUprightLeft_Med.gif SkunkRunningUprightRight_Med.gif SkunkSpritzingPerfume_Med.gif SkunkStinkSchoolDesk_Med.gif SkunkWalkingUprightLeft_Med.gif SkunkWalkingUprightRight_Med.gif SurprisedSkunkLiftTail_Med.gif SkunkChasing_Med.gif SkunkWalkingRight_Med.gif SwingingSkunk_Med.gif


 Found in InDaysOfYore/DanielBoone.


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 Found in Transport/Road/Cars.


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For available Big versions of these Animations: Click Here for Page 01; Click Here for Page 02.
For available XL versions of these Animations: Click Here for Page 01; Click Here for Page 02.



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