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There are approximately 300 species of Turtles and several species can live to be over a hundred years of age including the American Box Turtle. A group of Turtles is characteristically called a bale.

One documented case of longevity involves an adult Indian Ocean Giant Tortoise that, when captured as an adult, was estimated to be fifty years old. It then lived another 152 years in captivity.

Turtles live on every continent except Antarctica.

Some Turtles, such as the Musk Turtle, emit an odour when startled.

Turtles are cold-blooded; while most Turtles do not tolerate the cold well, the Blanding’s Turtle has been observed swimming under the ice in the Great Lakes region. One way Turtles regulate their temperature is by basking in the sun.

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Turtles will live in almost any climate warm enough to allow them to complete their breeding cycle.

Australia and the Americas contain a large variety of Turtle species but Europe contains only two species of Turtle and three species of Tortoise.

The top domed part of a Turtle’s shell is called the carapace and the bottom underlying part is called the plastron.

The shell of a Turtle is made up of 60 different bones all connected together This portion of the shell is covered with plates (scutes) that are derivatives of skin and offer additional strength and protection.

Turtles range in size from the Speckled Padloper and Bog Turtle at 10cm (4ins) to the m (10ft) and 680kgs (1,500lbs) Leatherback Sea Turtle.

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Most land Tortoises have high, domed carapaces that offer protection from the snapping jaws of terrestrial predators. Aquatic Turtles tend to have flatter, more hydrodynamically shaped shells. An exception to the dome-shaped Tortoise shell is the Pancake Tortoise of East Africa that will wedge itself between narrow rocks when threatened and then inflates itself with air making extraction nearly impossible.

Most Turtle species have five toes on each limb with a few exceptions including the American Box Turtle of the Carolina species that only has four toes and, in some cases, only three.

Turtles have good eyesight; an excellent sense of smell; excellent Hearing and a good sense of touch and their shell contains nerve endings.

Some aquatic Turtles can absorb oxygen through the skin on their neck and cloacal areas allowing them to remain submerged underwater for extended periods of time and enabling them to hibernate underwater.

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Turtles are one of the oldest and most primitive groups of reptiles and have outlived many other species. One can only wonder if their unique shell is somewhat responsible for their longevity.

Not all Turtles and Tortoises hibernate but the blood of hibernating Turtles acts somewhat like antifreeze, allowing it to tolerate cold temperatures.

Some female Turtles produce eggs four years after mating.

Many species make sound, especially while mating.

All Turtles lay their eggs in burrows on land usually on the same beach that they were born on. The incubation temperature determines the sex of the hatchling this is done by burying the eggs at different depths to produce male or female. Some Tortoises can dig burrows 13.7m (45ft) long.

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Hatching Turtles have an egg tooth at the end of their beak to help open the egg.

Some land Turtles can out run a human.

The colour and patterns of each species allows them to blend into their natural environment. The shells can break but they can regrow bony and keratin tissue.

Turtle shells are built into their skeleton; the top shell is called the carapace, is made up of approximately 50 bones. Not all Turtles have hard shells; e.g. Soft-Shell Turtles and Sea Turtles have flexible shells.

Box Turtles have a hinge to allow part of their shell to move there are other Turtles that have this as well. This enables them to close up tightly inside.

Counting the growth rings on the scutes (scales) of the top shell does not tell the age of the Turtle or Tortoise.

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Turtles cannot protrude their tongues from their mouths.

Aquatic Turtles have hydrodynamic shells to help them move through the water. They also have webbing between their toes to help with swimming.

Aquatic Turtles must be in water to eat.

Tortoises only go to water to drink. They do not swim.

Land Turtles ears are sensitive to ground vibration.

Many Turtles are expert climbers.

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All Turtles and Tortoises do not have the same habitat and nutritional requirements. Therefore, it is very important to research the kind of animal you have or plan to own.

One of the most common health problems with pet Turtles is MBD (Metabolic Bone Disease) caused by improper diet and care.

Turtles have good eyesight, seeing in full colour and a strong sense of smell. They have excellent hearing and sense of touch. Their shells have feeling due to nerve endings.

Instead of teeth, Turtles have a sharp beak for eating. Depending on species, the beak may be scissor-like, hook-like or serrated. The earliest Turtles did have teeth and could not retract their head.

Some Turtles can live up to a year without food.

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Tortoises from dry environments have thick scales on the skin to prevent fluid evaporation. Aquatic and semi-aquatic Turtles have thinner skin and lack heavy scales.

Turtles shed their skin in small flakes rather than pieces like other reptiles.

Sea Turtles can swim up to 56 k.p.h. (35 m.p.h.).

Several species, including the American Box Turtle, can live to be over 100 years old.

One documented case of longevity is of an adult Indian Ocean Giant Tortoise. After being captured and estimated to be 50 years old, it lived another 152 years in captivity.

In 1999, a three headed turtle was discovered by Lin Chi-Fa in his pond in Southern Taiwan.

For a list of Assie Turtles Click Here.

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Medium.
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Only Size.
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 Found in FairyTalesStories.


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 Found in Sayings.


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Because there are so many Big & XL animations I’m going to
break them into 02 pages to help in a faster download.
For available Big versions: Click Here for  Turtles 01;  Turtles 02.
For available XL versions: Click Here for  Turtles 01;  Turtles 02.

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