The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are not the only animations on Radios, Record Players, Jukeboxes & Stuff Like That and more Musical Animations can be accessed from the table near the bottom of the page.

NOTE: Radios, Record Players etc. has been split into 02 pages because of the great N° of animations. You’ll find the links to the other pages & other animations in this series in the table near the bottom of the page. On page 02 you’ll find the links to the Big & XL animations.



Radios, Record Players, Jukeboxes & Stuff Like That 01.
1930sRadioJumping_Med.gif 1930_40RadioPlaying01_Med.gif 1960EarlyRecordPlayerAlbumChange_Med.gif 1960EarlyRecordPlayerAlbumFlip_Med.gif 1960EarlyRecordPlayerPlaying_Med.gif 1960EarlyRecordPlayerPlayingNotes_Med.gif 1960LateRecordPlayer_Med.gif 1970CassettePlayerOpening_Med.gif 1970PortableStereoPlaying_Med.gif DJ_RaiseHand_Med.gif DJ_SpinningRecords_Med.gif RadioDiskJockeyOnAir_Med.gif Early1900GramophonePlaying_Med.gif GirlListening2Walkman_Med.gif GrannyWithTranny_Med.gif MusicPlayerBouncing_Med.gif MusicPlayerScrollingWordDownloads_Med.gif MusicPlayerScrollingWordMovies_Med.gif MusicPlayerScrollingWordMp3s_Med.gif MusicPlayerScrollingWordMusic_Med.gif


The History of the Phonograph.

TinFoilPhonograph.jpgThe Tin Foil Phonograph was the first of many great inventions developed by Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1931) in Menlo Park.

While he was working to improve the efficiency of a telegraph transmitter, he noticed that the tape of the machine gave off a noise that resembled spoken words when played at a high speed. This caused him to wonder if he could record a telephone message. He began experimenting with the diaphragm of a telephone receiver by attaching a needle to it. He reasoned that the needle could prick paper tape to record a message. His experiments led him to try a stylus on a tinfoil cylinder and to his great surprise it played back the short message he recorded, “Mary had a little lamb.”

On August 12th, 1877, he completed the model for the first phonograph. He then toured the USA with his tin foil phonograph and he was invited to the White House to demonstrate it to President Rutherford B. Hayes.

In 1878, he established the Edison Speaking Phonograph Company. He also suggested other uses for the phonograph, such as: letter writing and dictation, phonographic books and clocks that announce the time for blind people, family records (the recording family members in their own voices), music boxes and toys and a connection with the telephone so that communications could be recorded. All of these have been in use since the early 1900’s in one form or another.

The word phonograph was the trade name for Edison’s device, which played cylinders rather than discs. The machine had two needles: one for recording and one for playback. When you spoke into the mouthpiece, the sound vibrations of your voice would be indented onto the cylinder by the recording needle. This cylinder phonograph was the first machine that could record and reproduce sound created a sensation and brought Edison international fame.

EdisonCrankingHIsRecordingDevice_Med.gifEdisonsRecordingDevice_Med.gifEdisonTakingCatNap_Med.gif


BlueBar.gif


Visitor N°  
Free Text Counter.
Counter added 17/03/2015.

 Go to Radios, Record Players, Jukeboxes and Stuff Like That 02

MUSIC ETC.
ANIMALS. BEETHOVEN. BLUESMAN. BRASS. KEYBOARD.
NOTES. PEOPLE. NICK SAGGER. OPERA. PERCUSSION.
RADIOS, Etc. SPEAKERS, MICS, Etc. STRING. WIND.


.
MARCHING BANDS.
BLUE. BLUE TWIST. GREEN. GREEN TWIST.
RED. RED TWIST. SMILEY BANDS.

Top