The Animations on this Page are to the best of my knowledge are Royalty Free.

These are not the only animations of Clocks and more People Animations can be accessed from the table at the bottom of the page.

NOTE: Clocks has been split into 02 pages because of the great N° of animations. On page 02 you’ll find the links to the Big & XL animations.


A History Of Clocks.

The word ‘clock’ comes from a combination of the French word ‘cloche’, the Latin ‘glocio’, the Saxon ‘clugga’ and the German ‘glocke’ all meaning bell.

A.M. & P.M.

Meridian is Latin for Noon, (the middle of the day) Ante is Latin for Before hence A.M. (Before Noon) and Post is Latin for After hence P.M. (After Noon).

Although digital clocks routinely label noon ‘12:00P.M.’ you should avoid this expression not only because it is incorrect but because many people will imagine you are talking about midnight instead. The same goes for ‘12:00A.M..’ Just say or write ‘noon’ or ‘midnight’ when you mean those precise times or you can use the 24 hour times for Noon 1200 but in Australia and some other countries it is 0000 for midnight but America and some other countries use 2400. So this also could also get confusing.

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Elements Of A Clock.

Before we continue describing the evolution of ways to mark the passage of time, perhaps we should broadly define what constitutes a clock. All clocks must have two basic components:

1. A regular, constant or repetitive process orSunDial_Med.gifSandPouringInHourglass_Med.gif action to mark off equal increments of time. Earlier examples included the movement of the sun across the sky, candles marked in increments, oil lamps with marked reservoirs and sand glasses (A.K.A. Hourglasses).

The Orient, used knotted cords and small stone or metal mazes filled with incense that would burn at a certain pace. Modern clocks use a balance wheel, pendulum, vibrating crystal or electromagnetic waves associated with the internal workings of atoms as their regulators.

2. A means of keeping track of the increments of time and displaying the result. Our ways of keeping track of the passage of time include the position of clock hands and digital time displays.

The First Clock.

The discovery of first historic clock dating to some 6500 years ago (About the time of Noah.) was found by a joint archaeological mission of the University of Dallas and the Polish Institute in the area of Nabta 100K’s west of Abou Simbel in 2001.

It’s shaped as a circle made of stones whose diameter is 4 meters. There are 6 stones near the centre and arranged in two lines extending east and west.

Time is measured in this clock through the shade of the stones in the centre which falls on the stones of the circle.

They also found bulks of stones placed in correspondence with the positions of the stars in order to know the time of the different seasons especially the rainy ones.

Water Clocks.

Water clocks were among the earliest timekeepers that didn’t depend on the observation of celestial bodies. One of the oldest was found in the tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep I, buried around 1500B.C.. It was later named clepsydras (“water thieves”) by the Greeks, who began using them about 325B.C.. These were stone vessels with sloping sides that allowed water to drip at a nearly constant rate from a small hole near the bottom.

Other clepsydras were cylindrical or bowl-shaped containers designed to slowly fill with water coming in at a constant rate. Markings on the inside surfaces measured the passage of “hours” as the water level reached them. These clocks were used to determine hours at night but may have been used in daylight as well. Another version consisted of a metal bowl with a hole in the bottom; when placed in a container of water the bowl would fill and sink in a certain time. These were still in use in North Africa in the 20th century.

More elaborate and impressive mechanized water clocks were developed between 100B.C. and 500A.D. by Greek and Roman horologists and astronomers. The added complexity was aimed at making the flow more constant by regulating the pressure and at providing fancier displays of the passage of time. Some water clocks rang bells and gongs; others opened doors and windows to show little figures of people or moved pointers, dials and astrological models of the universe.

A Macedonian astronomer, Andronikos, supervised the construction of his Horologion, known today as the Tower of the Winds, in the Athens marketplace in the first half of the first century B.C.. This octagonal structure showed scholars and shoppers both sundials and mechanical hour indicators. It featured a 24 hour mechanized clepsydra and indicators for the eight winds from which the tower got its name and it displayed the seasons of the year and astrological dates and periods. The Romans also developed mechanized clepsydras, though their complexity accomplished little improvement over simpler methods for determining the passage of time.

In the Far East, mechanized astronomical/astrological SuSungWaterClock.gifclock making developed from 200 to 1300A.D.. Third-century Chinese clepsydras drove various mechanisms that illustrated astronomical phenomena. One of the most elaborate clock towers was built by Su Sung and his associates in 1088A.D.. Su Sung’s mechanism incorporated a water-driven escapement invented about 725A.D.. The Su Sung clock tower was over 30 feet tall and possessed a bronze power-driven armillary sphere for observations, an automatically rotating celestial globe and five front panels with doors that permitted the viewing of changing manikins which rang bells or gongs and held tablets indicating the hour or other special times of the day.

Since the rate of flow of water is very difficult to control accurately, a clock based on that flow could never achieve excellent accuracy. People were naturally led to other approaches.

Minute Hand.

In 1577, Jost Burgi invented the minute hand. Burgi’s invention was part of a clock made for Tycho Brahe, an astronomer who needed an accurate clock for his stargazing.

Wrist Watch.

In 1504, the first portable (but not very accurate) timepiece was invented in Nuremberg, Germany by Peter Henlein. The first reported person to actually wear a watch on the wrist was the French mathematician and philosopher, Blaise Pascal (1623-1662). With a piece of string, he attached his pocket watch to his wrist.

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Alarm Clocks.

An early prototype of the alarm clock was invented by the Greeks around 250B.C.. They built a water clock where the raising water would both keep time and eventually hit a mechanical bird that triggered an alarming whistle.

The first mechanical alarm clock was invented by Levi Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire, in 1787. However, the bell alarm could ring only at 4a.m.. On October 24, 1876 a mechanical windup alarm clock that could be set for any time was patented by Seth E Thomas.

AlarmClockShakingSleepingMan_Med.gif

1780 : Abraham Louis Perrelet invents the self winding movement.

1807 : Thomas Young invents the recording chronograph. (Forerunner to the Stopwatch)

1820 : Thomas Prest registers a patent for the self winding watch.

1844 : The start, stop and reset chronograph is invented by Adolph Nicole. Antoine LeCoultre invents the millionometre.

StopWatchRunning_Med.gif

1853 : Tissot makes the first dual time zone watch.

1884 : Greenwich, England is officially named the zero meridian and used as the world wide recognized basis of time zones.

1914 : Eterna introduces the first wristwatch with an alarm.

1923 : John Harwood (Swiss) invented is and he first to mass produce a self winding wristwatch.

1926 : Rolex introduces the first waterproof case called the “Oyster”.

OysterWithPearlInside_Med.gif

1929 : First anti magnetic watch created by Tissot.

1933 : Ingersoll introduces the “Mickey Mouse” watch.

1956 : Rolex introduces their first model that displays the day and date.

1957 : Hamilton introduces the world’s first battery driven watch.

1962 : Rado produces the world’s first scratch proof watch called the “Diastar 1”.

1962 : ETA of Switzerland develops the first quartz battery operated watch.

1970 : Hamilton releases the “Pulsar”, the first electronic digital watch.

1972 : Longines and Seiko introduce the LCD, (Liquid Crystal Display).

1986 : Audemars Piguet introduces the first self winding tourbillon.

1999 : Casio innovates with the first wristwatch with a built-in Global Positioning System (GPS).

Now we have clocks on TV’s, phones, DVD Player’s, I-pods, compters, Etc, Etc, Etc.

 



Medium.

 

BoredGirlSittingDeskClockwatching_Med.gif ClockFalling_Med.gif ClockHandsSpinningBackwards_Med.gif ClockFallingBackwards_Med.gif ClockMovingFastForward01_Med.gif ClockWatching_Med.gif CuckooClockCuckooing_Med.gif ItalianClockPendulumSwaying_Med.gif TimeClockClockingIn_Med.gif TimeClockHandsSpinningFast_Med.gif TimeRunningFront_Med.gif TimeRunningRight_Med.gif TimeRunningLeft_Med.gif PocketWatchGold_Med.gif


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